Water Signs Wins Blurb Radio’s Book of the Week Award

Water Signs Wins Blurb Radio’s Book of the Week Award

I had the wonderful opportunity to create a three-minute audio commercial for Water Signs, as part of a fiction competition for an exciting Blog Talk Radio show called Blurb! Hosted by Dr. Kent and Sally, this creative, entertaining program airs select blurbs submitted by aspiring authors, alternating genres (fiction, nonfiction, etc) every week. The hosts then comment live after playing each blurb for their listening audience, before ultimately selecting a winner for “Book of the Week.” On July 15, 2009 I was thrilled to appear on their show as the recipient of that week’s honor!

Many thanks to Dr. Kent and Sally.

For those of you who love to read, I highly recommend listening their innovative BTR show, which airs every Wednesday evening at 9 p.m. And for authors seeking more exposure for their work, I highly recommend contacting them to submit a blurb. Even if I hadn’t won, the process of distilling the major themes of my novel into a compelling, three-minute audio description was an excellent exercise that prepared me well for future interviews.

UPDATE: Since my interview eight years ago, there have been many changes. Looks like the show moved to Fridays at 12:30 PM ET for a while, but I haven’t seen any recent episodes. Visit Blurb’s Show Page on Blog Talk Radio for archived episodes.

Preview and purchase Water Signs: A Story of Love and Renewal on Amazon.com.

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Obamacare

Published by Canada Free Press in July, 2009, the following is an excerpt from an interview with Dr. Alphonse J. DiGiovanni (who happens to be my dad) on the perils of government-mandated and run healthcare. Visit the site to read the whole thing:

Doctor, can you give us a bit of history as to how this all began?

“Actually, the first intrusion of government into medicine was the Foran Bill in 1947, which came on the heels of England’s development of national healthcare when they regrettably rejected Winston Churchill. In retrospect, I am glad the Foran Bill did not pass; but at the time I was a real liberal. I’d gone to a public high school for gifted students—Central High School in Germantown, Philadelphia where the social sciences division was totally left. All I got was how bad the Republicans were, and how good the Democrats and FDR were. That was when I first heard the term trickle-down economics, long before that criticism was leveled at Ronald Reagan.

“In college, I participated in a debating session in which I had to argue in favor of the Foran Bill, but as I immersed myself in study, I began to realize what the cons were. I still thought it was good for the country but my attitudes really changed over time with Barry Goldwater, and Ronald Reagan’s impassioned speech on his behalf. That was very telling for me, and it absolutely changed my outlook.

“Then along came the first successful government intrusion into medicine in the form of the Medicare Act of 1969, which was President Johnson’s aim for his historical legacy. And they managed to pass it by throwing an incredible amount of money at hospitals, who were then allowed to triple and quadruple their fee structures. So not only hospitals, but physicians were very well paid, thus blunting all of the adversarial components, as people who were once opposed to it softened. That is how they were able to pass Medicare.From 1969 to the present-day, there’s been a progressive reduction in fee structures. And from what little is known about Obama’s plan, he is not going to throw the money into it that Johnson did—his plan is cradle-to-grave, purely socialistic. And there won’t simply be rationing of care for the elderly and disabled, but for everyone.”

What about Obama’s plan most concerns you?

“Well, I can’t really discuss specifics, because there’s not a whole lot of information out there yet. All we know at this point is that it is a general scheme of nationalization. And by the way they are attempting to speed it up and get it out there by August. My feeling is that they must already have their objectives in place, since this is a monumental undertaking. In general, I view socialized medicine as a gigantic game of Monopoly in which the government prints out a lot of money and masks the socialistic component in a euphemistic term—a ‘one-payer’ system. I would caution all Americans to be on the lookout for that.”

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Photoshopping Trig: The Left’s Latest Descent Into Depravity

Published by Canada Free Press, July 3, 2009:

After eight years of the Bush presidency and the 2008 election campaign, I am not quite sure why anything the left says or does surprises me. From the abhorrent film Assassination of a President (made while George W. Bush was still in office and presiding over two very difficult war fronts) to David Letterman’s “slutty flight attendant” slurs against the Governor of Alaska, I should know by now that the when it comes to destroying their political opponents, nothing is sacred to these people.

Not even an innocent baby.

Not even an innocent baby who happens to have Down syndrome.

Last week, I came across this nauseating item while perusing one of my favorite blogs, Gateway Pundit. The fact that it was posted by a Democratic party operative speaks volumes about the character (or lack thereof) of today’s Donkeys, for whom Palin Derangement Syndrome is apparently an incurable affliction. The self-proclaimed champions of “choice” sure are angry with Sarah Palin for going with the “life” option, thus the superimposition of the face of pro-life talk radio host Eddie Burke on baby Trig’s body. As commenter Tom W. explains:

“He (Eddie Burke) once called pro-choice women ‘baby killing maggots’, so his face was put on Trig’s body because — as a leftist told me — it’s the face of one person who should’ve been aborted put on the body of another person who should’ve been aborted.”

Lovely.

Read the rest at Canada Free Press.

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Female Jealousy and Sarah Palin

An excerpt from my article on Canada Free Press:

Last night on The O’Reilly Factor, guest host Monica Crowley interviewed a “GOP strategist” named Jennifer Millerwise Dyck about the repulsive Vanity Fair hit-job on Governor Palin. Normally an excellent challenger, Crowley unfortunately dropped the ball when Millerwise Dyck claimed that Governor Palin should stop engaging in “wars of words” with David Letterman and instead focus on energy issues and the business of her state. Ms. Millerwise Dyck is flat-out wrong on so many levels, it is hard to know where to start.

I suppose the fact that Governor Palin’s natural gas pipeline victory, “an historic achievement” to quote Palin directly, is of no consequence to out-of-touch Beltway types, nor is her recent visit to Kosovo and address to Camp Bondsteel soldiers an example of credible leadership and foreign diplomacy. During the interview last night, I waited for Crowley to rebut Millerwise Dyck with both of these examples, but unfortunately she chose not to do so.

Then there’s the matter of Palin’s Runner’s World magazine interview, which seems to have ticked off more than one alleged conservative female, at least on Facebook. One would think the Governor of Alaska had posed on a beach in a string bikini, or in a centerfold in Playboy the way some of these females are carrying on. Of course, these women do so under the guise of concern for Palin’s “credibility” in the media.

Oh really? Gee, I’d thought the media had already lost whatever remaining shred of credibility it had left after Washington Post reporter Eli Zaslow rhapsodized over Obama’s glistening pectoral muscles:

“The sun glistened off chiseled pectorals sculpted during four weightlifting sessions each week, and a body toned by regular treadmill runs and basketball games.”

Visit Canada Free Press to read the whole piece.

 

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