Monday Motivation: Living in Paradise

Monday Motivation: Living in Paradise

There’s nothing like a visit from a good friend to remind me that I live in paradise. Not only is Florida beautiful, but its accommodating weather allows for endless, low-cost (and no-cost) activities, including watching gorgeous sunsets on the Indian River and attending the Grant Seafood Festival.

Sunset on the Indian River.

It’s also fun to discover new places right in my own backyard, when motivated by the desire to show a visiting friend a good time in this part of The Sunshine State. One of them is Captain Hiram’s in Sebastian.

Then there’s the discovery of beautiful B & B’s like The Seaglass Inn in Melbourne Beach.

Located on Ocean Ave., between the Indian River and the Atlantic Ocean, The Seaglass Inn is a perfect getaway. My friend has been raving about the friendly service, accommodations, and delicious breakfasts since her arrival on Saturday. Having met one of the owners the other day after picking her up at the airport and driving her here, I can attest to her review. No matter how attractive and well maintained, if a Bed and Breakfast lacks owners who truly love the business of hospitality, a guest will not return.

A few years ago, my friend (along with family members and another friend that same year), stayed at another lovely place in the area. However, as much as it boasted a naturally serene setting on the river, upscale amenities, and pristine conditions, its owner appeared to be in the wrong industry — as evidenced by his attitude and actions. Whenever I came by to hang out with her, he acted annoyed, as if I had no right to be there. When she arrived, the first thing he asked for was a credit card. I received the same feedback from others who stayed there on my recommendation. Despite the fact that I’d referred three substantial reservations to his B & B in a span of a month that year, this grouchy innkeeper never even bothered to thank me. His sour demeanor is the reason why none of them have returned…even though they all have been back to this part of Florida since then.

In stark contrast, the owner of The Seaglass Inn appeared genuinely happy to greet us (even me, the local) when we arrived. He engaged in friendly conversation as he described the various amenities and led us to the Royal Palm room. Now when I visit or stop by to pick her up, there’s no apprehension about being there. Not surprisingly, I’m envisioning a staycation there in the near future.

If you’re planning a trip to Melbourne Florida and vicinity anytime soon, I highly recommend The Seaglass Inn. Click here for more information.

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The Formula with Jefferson Keith Langley, Episode 4

The Formula with Jefferson Keith Langley, Episode 4

When you’re a host on internet radio, you learn to improvise when a scheduled guest goes missing or announces at the last minute that they need to reschedule. Such was the case the other day when it was Jefferson Keith Langley’s turn to host on Writestream Radio Network.

If you don’t know him, here’s an excerpt from his bio on Writestream Radio.com:

Jefferson Keith Langley always had the winning mindset from a young age when he excelled in sports all the way to semi-pro status. Moving to Los Angeles from Texas at 19, he began his twenty-year career in entertainment, TV and media working as an assistant for numerous top people and companies on such projects as Gatorade; Smashing Pumpkins; Orbit Gum; Coors Light; Dave Mathews Band; Quentin Tarantino’s A Band Apart; Propaganda; Sony Pictures; Kaye Films; Emmy-award- winning director/TV showrunner Paris Barclay; Wayne Isham; Nigel Dick; Kinka Usher; Silver Pictures; and recognizable films like Starship Troopers, Tales From the Crypt and NBC/Universal series The Chang Family Saves the World for Misher Films just to name a few.

He co-founded a boutique production and finance company with an investor from Silicon Valley where he was President of Development and Production for over two years handling day to day operations, business affairs strategies to diversify the company portfolio, optioning material, negotiating deals, leading writer meetings, while managing, developing and raising funds for the slate of projects. He has been hired by film financiers to consult and write materials for fantasy thrillers and comedies as well.

This led to Jefferson expanding his spectrum and becoming a top adviser/consultant across all industries. His clients consist of financiers, producers, venture capitalists, creative types, pop singers, actors, oil and gas execs, sport athletes, jewelry designers, celebrities, entrepreneurs, global brands, top political aides, former intelligence officers, and many more. His unique, cutting-edge, one-of-a-kind techniques and innovative applications continue to garner rave reviews from his colleagues and clients through their referrals and recommendations. Jefferson’s knack for seeing to the core of things, coming up with innovative solutions, and providing guidance and execution all the way through to reaching the finish line garnered him the personal title, “THE HUMAN ARCHITECT.”

Since I produce his show The Formula, which airs every fourth Tuesday of the month on Writestream Radio, I decided to turn the tables and interview him. We spent an interesting, informative 90 minutes discussing his “blueprint” philosophy for individuals, which he incorporates into his one-on-one coaching sessions with entrepreneurs. To listen, click here.

Would you like to connect with Jefferson? Visit ABETHIA.com and Artitechtronix.com.

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Ash Wednesday Musings

Ash Wednesday Musings

Growing up Catholic and attending Catholic school, Ash Wednesday always felt like a somber day of remembering one’s bodily mortality, e.g. “Remember man that thou art dust, and unto dust you shall return,” and deciding which decadent treats (chocolate, soda, cake, etc.) you were willing to give up. For better or worse, the day became synonymous with dieting for many people, as the concept of self-denial centered around food and beverages. Some argued that you could have Sundays “off” while others insisted you must stick to it for the full 40 days.

Why the discrepancy?

According to Catholicism.About.com:

Lent, the period of prayer and fasting in preparation for Easter, is 40 days long, but there are 46 days between Ash Wednesday, the first day of Lent in the Roman Catholic liturgical calendar, and Easter. So how are the 40 days of Lent calculated?

A Little History

The answer takes us back to the earliest days of the Church. Christ’s original disciples, who were Jewish, grew up with the idea that the Sabbath—the day of worship and of rest—was Saturday, the seventh day of the week since the account of creation in Genesis says that God rested on the seventh day.

Christ rose from the dead, however, on Sunday, the first day of the week, and the early Christians, starting with the apostles (those original disciples), saw Christ’s Resurrection as a new creation, and so they transferred the day of rest and worship from Saturday to Sunday.

Sunday: The Celebration of the Resurrection

Since all Sundays—and not simply Easter Sunday—were days to celebrate Christ’s Resurrection, Christians were forbidden to fast and do other forms of penance on those days.

Therefore, when the Church expanded the period of fasting and prayer in preparation for Easter from a few days to 40 days (to mirror Christ’s fasting in the desert, before He began His public ministry), Sundays could not be included in the count.

Thus, in order for Lent to include 40 days on which fasting could occur, it had to be expanded to six full weeks (with six days of fasting in each week) plus four extra days—Ash Wednesday and the Thursday, Friday, and Saturday that follow it. Six times six is thirty-six, plus four equals forty. And that’s how we arrive at the 40 days of Lent!

While I’m supportive of anyone using this time to deprive themselves of sweets (and lose weight in the process), I also love this idea from Aleteia.com:

During Lent we want to de-emphasize ourselves and emphasize our dependence on God. Almsgiving (materially sharing with those in need) is one of the three “pillars” of Lent. (The other two pillars are prayer and fasting.) We can give in ways other than money. In giving up things around our house that we don’t need, we can detach from “stuff” while helping others.

Here’s the challenge: During the 40 days of Lent, find one thing each day you no longer need. For most of us, this should be really easy. It could be a kitchen item, a jacket, a bike, an unopened gift hanging around. Go through your closets, drawers, basement, even the garage.

Click here to read the full post.

For me, it’s also about releasing old beliefs and thought patterns while embracing the knowledge that we are all children of God. With that in mind, here are some suggestions. During Lent 2017, let’s fully let go of:

  • Self-Doubt
  • Worry
  • Fear
  • Laziness
  • Impatience
  • Jealousy
  • Selfishness
  • Distrust
  • Comparing Ourselves to Others

Instead, embrace our individuality as creations of God. Celebrate the unique gifts He has given to each of us. Vow to use them in service to your family, friends, neighbors, community, country, workplace and/or business. Stop the comparison/jealousy game and recognize that we are all here for our own purpose. It has been said that “comparison is the thief of joy.” I fully agree.

No matter how you honor the season of Lent, remember to express gratitude for all that you are and all that you have. Focus on your blessings, not your problems. By doing so, you just may find that God will guide you through every obstacle.

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Happy Mardi Gras 2017!

Happy Mardi Gras 2017!

Here’s a little history about the holiday from History.com:

A Christian holiday and popular cultural phenomenon, Mardi Gras dates back thousands of years to pagan spring and fertility rites. Also known as Carnival, it is celebrated in many countries around the world–mainly those with large Roman Catholic populations–on the day before the religious season of Lent begins. Brazil, Venice and New Orleans play host to some of the holiday’s most famous public festivities, drawing thousands of tourists and revelers every year.

Many historians believe that the first American Mardi Gras took place on March 3, 1699, when the French explorers Iberville and Bienville landed in what is now Louisiana, just south of the holiday’s future epicenter: New Orleans. They held a small celebration and dubbed the spot Point du Mardi Gras. In the decades that followed, New Orleans and other French settlements began marking the holiday with street parties, masked balls and lavish dinners. When the Spanish took control of New Orleans, however, they abolished these rowdy rituals, and the bans remained in force until Louisiana became a U.S. state in 1812.

On Mardi Gras in 1827, a group of students donned colorful costumes and danced through the streets of New Orleans, emulating the revelry they’d observed while visiting Paris. Ten years later, the first recorded New Orleans Mardi Gras parade took place, a tradition that continues to this day. In 1857, a secret society of New Orleans businessmen called the Mistick Krewe of Comus organized a torch-lit Mardi Gras procession with marching bands and rolling floats, setting the tone for future public celebrations in the city. Since then, krewes have remained a fixture of the Carnival scene throughout Louisiana. Other lasting customs include throwing beads and other trinkets, wearing masks, decorating floats and eating King Cake.

Louisiana is the only state in which Mardi Gras is a legal holiday. However, elaborate carnival festivities draw crowds in other parts of the United States during the Mardi Gras season as well, including Alabama and Mississippi. Each region has its own events and traditions.

Visit History.com to learn more. How are you celebrating?

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