Writestream Tuesday: Shatter the Narrative

WritestreamLogo-800x533Are you a creative person/writer/reader who loves liberty? Are you tired of the false, pervasive narratives used in pop culture and the media to constantly deride, mock, and repudiate the United States and patriotic Americans?

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If you’ve had it with this nonsense, we invite you to listen to our special “Shatter the Narrative” show on Tuesday, November 18 with talented, patriotic authors Sarah Hoyt, Marina Fontaine, Tom Knighton, Declan Finn, and Daniella Bova. Moderated by Writestream founder Dariaanne, the panel will gleefully shatter the following narratives:

  1. The myth of the American suburbs as soulless, horrible places to live;
  2. The myth of European intellectual and cultural superiority over Americans;
  3. The myth of constitutional conservatives as dour, humorless people;
  4. The glamorization of mass murdering revolutionaries like Che Guevara and the romanticizing of brutal political ideologies like communism.

During the live show, we invite you to call in with your comments at (347) 945-7246. After the panel, be sure to stay tuned for the Right Wing Riot with the Luminaries of Liberty: Ms. Always Right, Scary Smart, and The Prince of Whitebread!

RWR_logo_350x300To listen online, click on this link to Writestream Tuesday: Shatter the Narrative. Or you can call (347) 945-7246 to listen by phone (press 1 if you would like to ask a question or make a comment on the air).

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See you on Tuesday, November 18 at 1 p.m. Eastern for Writestream Tuesday: Shatter the Narrative!

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Love Liberty & Lip Gloss: Fantasy Dating Game with Suzanne Casamento

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Has the internet dating scene become a chore? Are you tired of being hurt after yet another promising relationship fails? Don’t despair,the Fantasy Dating Game is here!

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Founded by Suzanne Casamento shortly after “going crazy” following her 30th birthday, the Fantasy Dating Game is a unique, innovative way to rebuild your confidence and stop the self-defeating whining and questioning. After all, when you stop asking “What’s wrong with me?” and start appreciating your own self-worth, you’ll stop attracting guys with something wrong with them and start attracting guys worthy of your time and attention.

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Lisa Tarves and I were so intrigued by Suzanne’s unique concept, we invited her to be our guest on Love Liberty & Lip Gloss on Thursday, November 13 at 7 p.m. Eastern. We hope you’ll pour yourself your favorite beverage and tune in! Got a question during the show? Call us at (347) 945-7246. The chat room will also be open for your participation.

Fantasy Dating Game founder Suzanne Casamento.
Fantasy Dating Game founder Suzanne Casamento.

To listen online, click on this link to Love Liberty & Lip Gloss: Fantasy Dating Game with Suzanne Casamento, or listen by phone by dialing (347) 945-7246.

 

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Love Liberty & Lip Gloss: Life Lessons for Teenagers with Kelly Tonelli

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Are you raising teenagers? Are you a teen struggling to figure out your place in the world?Please tune in tomorrow at 7 p.m. Eastern when my lovely co-host Lisa Tarves and I welcome clinical psychologist Kelly Tonelli to Love Liberty & Lip Gloss to talk about life lessons for teenagers:

Kelly Tonelli is a clinical psychologist working in private practice with patients who are experiencing life transitions, many of whom are teenage girls. She happily relocated from Michigan to Southern California to attend Pepperdine University and fell in love with the sunshine (snow is cold). She’s been fortunate to have spent time working and learning at Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles (CHLA) before going into private practice. She divides her time between her practice, writing, spending time with her husband, and driving her daughter to dance class.

To listen, click on this link to Love Liberty & Lip Gloss with Kelly Tonelli or call (347) 945-7246 to listen by phone. Got a question for our guest? Hit “1” to be placed in the queue.

Here’s a bit about Kelly Tonelli from her website:

Dr. Kelly Tonelli is a California licensed clinical psychologist (PSY 19248) providing solution-focused treatment aimed at symptom reduction.  She works with her clients to identify treatment goals and collaborate on a treatment plan to meet those goals.

Dr. Tonelli provides the following services:

  • Psychoeducational assessment to assist in diagnosis of Learning Disabilities and/or Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder
  • Assessment to aid in diagnostic clarification
  • Solution-focused outpatient mental health treatment aimed at symptom reduction
  • Assistance with negotiating accomodations and special assistance from employers and/or school districts
  • Behavior management to aid in behavioral difficulties that occur within the home and/or school
  • Assistance with medication management through collaboration with the prescribing physician

See you on Thursday, November 6 at 7 p.m. Eastern for Love Liberty & Lip Gloss!

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The Snobby Girl Cancer Club

Announcing the formation of a new, private Facebook group for women dealing with cancer and those who love them: Snobby Girl Cancer Club.

Snobby Girl Cancer Club with Lucy

 

Meet Lucy. Lucy is our Snobby Girl mascot representing Lady Cancer Awareness.

Lucy is stepping out in her finest to promote the awareness of breast, endometrial, uterine, cervical and ovarian cancer.

You are cordially invited to become of member of the Snobby Girl Club. Our club is exclusive as we are not soliciting members but alas, they will find us. You see, our girls have all dealt with cancer whether as a Fighter, NED (No Evidence of Disease), Survivor, or Caregiver. Lucy is our symbol of beauty and hope for a cure.

We will be offering a line of clothing with Lucy and Ovarian Cancer Awareness. She will sport a sassy little ribbon off of her tail. As of now, this ribbon is teal; however, we have plans to incorporate other colors.

Maureen and I have several plans in the works for full line of Snobby Girl apparel and other items, so stay tuned to her Maureen Miles Bucci Author Page for breaking news. See you in the Snobby Girl Club! ;)

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The Art of Giving Constructive Criticism

toastmastersOne of the many reasons I joined a local Toastmaster’s chapter is to develop the ability to offer constructive criticism. While becoming competent in oral communication is a fundamental goal of membership in the organization, so is learning to become a better listener. Cultivating this valuable skill  makes it possible to offer thoughtful feedback on someone’s speech, but it requires genuine interest and focused concentration. At our last meeting, I took on the task of speech evaluator for the very first time as part of my effort to ease into the act of making my first speech (called an “Ice Breaker”) by starting with smaller roles first.

To say I was nervous about standing up in front of the room and making an oral critique would be a monumental understatement. There is definitely an art to providing meaningful, useful criticism designed to help a speaker acknowledge both their strengths and weaknesses in order to become an even better communicator. While I realize I have a very long way to go in this area, I appreciated the positive reviews I received from others in attendance, including the speech giver.

While Toastmasters focuses on the development of competent communication and leadership qualities for individual members, the same principles hold true for the written word. As an author and book reviewer, I understand this well.

Writer's BlockFirst, to take on the author part: I fully understand that as much as I strive to develop themes through my plots and character development in any given novel, not every reader is going to “get” them. We all process entertainment in the form of the written word (and on film and other mediums) though the prism of our own unique experiences, after all. When I sat down to write Water Signs, I never set out to produce a tawdry romance novel, but instead a coming of age story in which sex and attitudes about sex play an integral role. My main character struggles to balance her morality while living in a society that has all but abandoned the “old-fashioned” values with which she was raised. At the same time, she’s human. She experiences the normal desires that go along with being a young woman (and as the story progresses, an older and wiser one). Hence, her inner turmoil often manifests in self-defeating and even frightening ways (e.g. anxiety disorder). Having a much more worldly boyfriend complicates her own personal growth journey and relationship with main character, Ken — not to mention other guys she dates along the way.

However, I never intended the book to be perceived as yet another cheap, formulaic romance where meaningless dialogue and a canned plot provide filler in between raunchy, explicit love scenes. Up until now, no one (at least no one that I am aware of) has viewed it that way. Most readers (those who have contacted me personally and/or posted reviews) have perceived Water Signs as a contemporary romance with plenty to say about the modern dating scene and other realities of current times.

Let me clarify: I am seeking thoughtful criticism; I’m not expecting the whole world to fawn over my book, fall in love with its two main characters, or give me nothing but 5-star reviews. That’s completely unrealistic, not to mention a hindrance to my own growth and improvement as a writer. I do, however, appreciate it when someone takes the time to point out the good (even if it’s simply an acknowledgment of better-than-average writing skills, use of literary technique, or story pacing) while (as I am learning to do at Toastmasters) identifying areas that need improvement.

Which brings me back to my dilemma.

Are some reviewers just more thoughtful than others? Or is it all a matter of perception based on their own personal experience (and not so much what the author was attempting to say through plot and characters)? Perhaps it’s a combination of both? Can a reader who does not fit the parameters of your target audience even offer a balanced review to begin with?

WaterSigns2.jpgAll are important considerations.

Nevertheless, we as authors simply cannot control readers’ perceptions of our work — nor should we even seek to do so. While I am incredibly disappointed in the characterization of my book as a “bodice ripper,” perhaps it will attract a whole new audience. Who knows? Guess I’ll just have to wait and see, although my guess is that readers of Harlequin romances will most likely dismiss Maddy and her entire family as hopelessly out of touch and prudish.

Unlike speeches, books are much more subjective – unless of course, they are truly unreadable due to things like poor grammar and lack of a coherent plot – for which perhaps a 1-star review is appropriate. For the record, no one has accused Water Signs of either of these, although privately someone told me they hated my characters — to the point of wanting to take an ax to them. That was definitely a first.

Given that most others have had a completely opposite take, this is very perplexing. Whether you hate it, love it, or fall somewhere in between, referring to Water Signs as a bodice ripper completely misses the point. Which circles back to every author’s conundrum: we cannot control how others perceive our work because – as with many experiences in life – readers bring along their own preconceived ideas. In the case of my novel, maybe it’s about time a reader presented a different take on the story – whether I agree with it or not.

When I write a book review, I make an effort to specify the positive aspects, e.g. a hard-hitting scene, a particularly compelling bit of dialogue, or the writer’s remarkable talent for drawing the reader into the story through the use of descriptive prose — whatever elements I can honestly rave about. If there are things I don’t like, or believe could use some improvement, I point them out in a constructive way. At least, these are my goals when I sit down to write a critique. Am I perfect at it? Not at all. That’s where Toastmasters comes in, along with the practice of reading and reviewing books regularly. Learn and improve by doing.

As I move forward in my own professional development with Toastmasters, I hope I’ll not only become better at critiquing (and giving) speeches, but also reading and reviewing books.

As for my next meeting role, I’ll be the evening’s “Ah, Um Counter,” which means I’ll definitely be listening closely to all speakers. And as my involvement in the organization progresses, I hope to eliminate my own bad “Ah,” “Um,” and “You know” habits.

Stay tuned….and keep on writing!

 

 

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