The Writestream with Daria Anne Welcomes Book Publicist Michelle Kulp on April 5

The Writestream with Daria Anne Welcomes Book Publicist Michelle Kulp on April 5

Please join us on Wednesday, April 5 at 11 AM Eastern:

According to Forbes Magazine, your book is your new business card. Are you a busy entrepreneur looking to enhance or expand your business by publishing a book but don’t know where to begin?

Tune in for the debut of The Writestream with Daria Anne on Wednesday, April 5 at 11 AM Eastern when she welcomes Michelle Kulp, author, book publicist, entrepreneur and 6 Figure Woman.

Michelle Kulp, Is an International Book Launch Expert, Book Publishing Specialist, And #1 Bestselling Author.  Michelle Teaches Women (And A Few Select Men) How to Build a Business That Nourishes Their Soul & How to Become a Highly Paid “AUTHOR-ITY” In Their Field!

Motto: Work Less, Make More

Michelle Kulp helps experts, entrepreneurs, consultants and coaches write, publish and promote their books and become #1 bestselling authors!

Through her “Amazon Bestseller Program” she helps authors create a back-end income stream with their bestselling book as well as leverage their new bestseller status. Her Amazon Bestseller program is a one-stop shop for authors who don’t have the knowledge, expertise or skill-set to publish and market their own books. Michelle takes her 12 years of online experience and provides a much-needed service to experts who want to use a book to attract new clients, elevate their credibility and create a new income stream.

Michelle is the bestselling author of several of her own books on Amazon including: #GirlBoss In Training, Quit Your Job and Follow your Dreams: A 12 Month Guide to Becoming Joyfully Jobless; I Love Myself When; Woman Take Hold of Your Power, Ocean Writing, Never Work Again: 6 Secrets to Earning a PlayCheck Instead of a Pay-Check, & Bestseller in 30 Days.

Quote from Michelle: “Having a bestselling book is the best way I know to instantly elevate your credibility and reach thousands of new followers.”

Michelle also works with a handful of entrepreneurs in her 12-Month Mastermind Program, “The Rising Stars”, where she guides them in fast tracking their business goals and dreams in a supportive and action-oriented environment!

Michelle teaches, “Do the work once and get paid over and over because that’s how you leverage time. Without it, you are always going to be trading hours for dollars and there are only so many hours in the day.”

Michelle knows about this first hand as she left a 17-year career in the legal field as a paralegal and legal secretary in 2000 because she was burnt out working in a high-stress environment; through the journey of recreating and reinventing herself, Michelle learned to trust her intuition, put herself first and to believe in and follow her dreams!

She also learned that there is no such thing as an “overnight success” and that you have to put in your 10,000 hours, like author Malcolm Gladwell says in his bestselling book, Outliers, “It takes about 10,000 hours of practice to become an expert at anything!” Although putting in your 10,000 hours won’t guarantee success it will help stack the cards in your favor; that’s where Michelle’s gift of helping women learn to identify their strengths and outsource the rest comes in!

Many clients of Michelle’s have gone on to create successful online businesses. Unfortunately when it comes to making money online, “You don’t know what you don’t know.” So whether they are new to making money online or have been online and just haven’t cracked the code to making 6-figure, Michelle has been where you are and can show you the quickest path to achieving your goals through her guidance, support and mentoring.

To stream the episode through your computer, click on this link to The Writestream with Daria Anne Welcomes Book Publicist Michelle Kulp, on Wednesday, April 5 at 11 AM Eastern. We welcome your calls at (347) 945-7246.

Download the FREE eBook, Your Book Is Your New Business Card at Writestream Publishing.com.

(Image Credit: Kimberly McGath).

 

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Love Liberty & Lip Gloss with Donna Lyons, Jefferson Keith Langley and Ima Sumac Watkins on Cyber Bullying

Love Liberty & Lip Gloss with Donna Lyons, Jefferson Keith Langley and Ima Sumac Watkins on Cyber Bullying

Last night, Love Liberty & Lip Gloss host Donna Lyons welcomed guests Jefferson Keith Langley and Ima Sumac Watkins to discuss their horrific ordeal with cyber bullying. Thanks to the malicious intent and actions of one disturbed individual, these two entrepreneurs nearly lost everything: their businesses, reputation, and personal relationships — even their ability to obtain a menial “pay the bills” job to tend to the most basic necessities.

It’s bad enough in a Digital Age that vulnerable teenagers are targets of this vile crime, but last night, listening to these two professionals share their story made me realize that no one is immune. And the worst part is, the way the law works, the burden of proof is on the victim, not the criminal. Furthermore, because the internet and social media make it easy for anyone to hide behind a computer screen and keyboard, producing the evidence that will stand up in court is next to impossible.

As the co-founder and co-owner of Writestream Publishing and Writestream Radio, I deal with a variety of clients and personalities. Some projects are more time-consuming and challenging than others. And although I always do my best and strive for excellence in every effort, I am only human. I’ve had to correct mistakes. Thankfully, everyone I’ve dealt with so far understands this.

But Jefferson and Ima’s story opened my eyes to the reality of running a business in an era of new technology. Much to their credit, they never gave up and battled their way back. You can listen to their full interview below, which I highly recommend.

Listeners of Writestream Radio know that Jefferson joined the network last November as the host of The Formula. As Donna’s friend, he’d been a guest on her show before, which led him to inquire about hosting his own program. After speaking with Jefferson and hearing his ideas, I happily offered him a monthly slot, which I produce. I could tell right away that he was a person of good character — and not just by virtue of the fact that he was a friend of a trusted friend.

As Ima mentions in the interview, most human beings today do an internet search on people, whether out of natural curiosity or palpable suspicion. With respect to Jefferson, I did my own internet search because his background and accomplishments were so impressive, I wanted to know more. That’s when I came across some alarming, vicious posts about him and Ima, which I dismissed outright. After thinking it over, I decided not to confront Jefferson, figuring he’d already spent countless hours and energy reclaiming his life and reputation. Besides, my intuition told me he was a man of honor. I had no reason to take the word of a coward with a computer and an intention to smear. I’m grateful he and Ima had the opportunity to give a detailed account of their experience on the air. Rather than wallow in the unfairness of it all, they have chosen to rise above it and become even better people.

Ultimately, their cautionary tale has inspired me to be increasingly mindful in all of my interactions, to continue documenting all communications, and to practice discernment with every client, potential client, and person who crosses my path. It also reminded me of a recent caller to Just Believe with Ilene Gottlieb, who had also been a victim of cyber-bullying. My heart broke for this poor woman as she explained that her reputation had been shredded, thanks to a liar with a keyboard and an internet connection (paraphrasing slightly). Since forewarned is forearmed, I’m reaping the benefits of others’ experience and encourage my readers to do the same.

To learn the truth about Jefferson and his work, visit ABETHIA.com and Artitechtronix.com. To learn the truth about Ima Sumac Watkins, follow her on Instagram and click on About.me.

 

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“A” Is For Adjustment

“A” is for Adjustment

My favorite baby photo of my “big brother” Ralph.

Early on in my parents’ visit last week, I used the old standby “A is for apple” to help us remember where we parked at a particular location. But as events played out over the past seven days, I’ve realized that at this point in time, “A” is for adjustment.

Let’s just say our time together did not unfold quite as intended, since none of us wanted or expected my dad’s four-day hospitalization to be part of the activities. Thankfully, he’s alright now.

“A” is for Adjustment.

My mother had a painful arthritis flare-up in her finger, which impacted her ability to enjoy her time in Florida. Although she looks at least ten years younger than her actual age, she takes naps now — something she never did before.

“A” is for Adjustment.

It’s not easy to acknowledge the effects of aging on your parents, especially when you’ve been accustomed to a mother and father who are full of life, optimistic, smart, fun-loving and interested in a variety of things ranging from professional sports and college basketball to politics and cultural events. As I make my adjustment to this new phase of their life, I focus on gratitude for having been their child and for still having them here with me on Earth.

“A” is for Adjustment.

Ralph in elementary school.

But as difficult as it has been to make that shift, what’s happening with my brother Ralph is the hardest to take. Born with A Little Down Syndrome, he has already overcome tremendous obstacles, with the help of my parents, our extended family, friends, teachers, and mentors. He exceeded expectations and overcame one misguided doctor’s dire prediction by being a good student (an astute elementary school teacher asked my parents for permission to promote him to a slow learners class, where he thrived) and eventually finding employment at Mercy Catholic Medical Center for 23 years, where he consistently received excellent employee reviews from happy bosses.

Most importantly, his outgoing, gregarious personality and loving nature affected everyone who knew him. How could anyone not be enriched by spending time with Ralph — someone who loved unconditionally, embraced life fully, and found joy in the simplest activities. While we were growing up, he was my go-to playmate who never turned me away and always made me laugh, no matter what we decided to do. Our most famous collaboration as kids was our imitation of Danny Zuko and Sandy Olson from the movie Grease, as they danced and their way through the fun-house in the final scene (in our case, the two long steps leading into our rec room served as our version of “The Shake Shack.”) It’s a miracle no one broke the vinyl (remember those?) soundtrack to the movie to end the insanity of our endless, repetitive demonstrations.

Shockingly, no one did. As a matter of fact, many years later at Ralph’s 40th birthday party, family members and friends begged us for a re-enactment, which we happily obliged. Back then, I was so grateful that he’d hit the 4-0 milestone, I didn’t care about making a fool of myself.

Ralph with nieces Sophia (left) and Julianna celebrating his 50th.

Fast forward another 10 years. We held another special celebration in honor of Ralph’s 50th birthday — an Oscar-themed party complete with life-size cut-outs and posters of his favorite actors like Clint Eastwood, and replicas of the Oscar statue. At the time, he was still passionate about movies, reading, dancing, and the WWE.

I miss those days. I miss my happy-go-lucky special brother who never needed coaxing to smile; or to put on music, sing, and dance; or to read a book.

None of us knew back then that Ralph would soon face his most formidable opponent yet; one much more powerful than Down Syndrome. One that had no mercy in its zeal to rob him of everything he’d worked so hard to accomplish, including a fully functioning mind that could comprehend John Grisham novels, and remember the names of soft drinks, and whether or not he’d taken a shower that morning, or if his clothes needed to go into the laundry.

A friend of mine had warned me about the link between Down Syndrome and Alzheimer’s years before Ralph’s diagnosis. Like any good sister, I prayed that he would be spared such a fate. Surely, God would not ask him to endure something so awful after he’d already proven himself to be a worthy overcomer?

For reasons unknown to me, Ralph was not spared from this memory-stealing monster, for which he has been on medication for almost five years. Back then, the doctor warned that it would only delay the inevitable. I suppose some gratitude is appropriate because it did stop the progression much longer than I had anticipated.

Back in the day: Ralph and I engaging in one of our favorite childhood rituals.

Even so, his personality completely transformed over time. The outgoing, confident guy who loved to laugh, joke around, and talk incessantly was gradually replaced by a reticent, serious and somber shell of his former self who sat in silence during car rides, lashed out at good-natured teasing and lost interest in just about every hobby he’d previously engaged in with passion. No longer does Ralph beg to go the movies or express interest in books, music or wrestlers like John Cena (one of his former favorites.) In fact, if you ask him about a movie he’s just seen, he has difficulty expressing any sort of informed opinion about it.

These days, the only activities he still seems to enjoy are bowling, slot machines, and using his iPad.

“A” is for Adjustment.

Somewhere along the way, during one of my visits, I was working downstairs in my parents’ basement when Ralph approached me in tears. “I want my life back. I want my memory back,” he cried, putting his arms around me. While my heart was breaking, all I could do was hug him and assure him that I would be there for him, no matter what. Nothing — not even Alzheimer’s — could ever make me lose sight of who he really is. In my mind, I contemplated how I would handle the devastating time when he would no longer remember me or anyone else in the family. It seemed impossible to comprehend but I vowed to hold onto my memories of him and do the best I could to adjust.

Celebrating mom’s birthday, circa 1992.

Which brings me back to the present. I’d been handling some unforeseen events involving an unreasonable client whose hurtful words temporarily affected my confidence and caused me to question everything I was doing professionally. Then Ralph arrived with my parents and changed my perspective.

In a horrifying moment of confirmation, we realized the doctor was right about the medication when Ralph insisted he was home in Newtown Square and not in Melbourne — even though we were surrounded by palm trees, balmy breezes and sunshine. I reminded him about the plane ride he’d taken the day before, with no success. At some point he let it go, leaving me to wonder if it’s best to just agree with him in these situations, rather than attempt to bring him back to reality.

“A” is for Adjustment.

The Ralph I loved from my earliest memories of childhood is gone, though his pure heart and capacity for unconditional love remain. He began to take his leave about a year or so after marking his 50th birthday in grand style. I mourn him every day, even as I continue to love and support the man he has become — a brave soul who continues to fight a merciless opponent that will not be satisfied until it takes everything away from him. Everything, that is, except the love of his family and friends.

“A” is for Adjustment. 

At this point, it’s all I can do.

 

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